Mascarpone Sorbet

There are some fabulous recipes for Mascarpone Sorbet out there, Thomas Keller’s comes to mind. This is not that. You don’t need an ice cream maker or any special skills for that matter. Just for fun, you might want to check out this post on his recipe.

Then compare this one: Soften a pint of lemon sorbet on the counter. Put that in a food processor with 6 oz. of mascarpone cheese. Blend. Spoon into pretty serving cups or ramekins and refreeze. Defrost slightly before serving for optimum complex, creamy, tangy flavor.
Can you envision endless possibilities for a garnish? Strawberry slices, mint leaves, lemon wheel, maraschino cherry, a dollop of chutney, candied flower petals…Keller serves his with rhubarb confit and candied fennel.
My recipe technique is so embarrassingly simple, that I am reluctant to share it with my guests. But I’m happy share it with you.

English Fruits For Cheese

I am fascinated by food pairings. This fabulous pairing is a Danish Blue Cheese with an English Lime & Chilli Fruit Puree on toasted Italian Ciabatta.


The cheese is triple-cream, soft blue-veined Castello Blue. It has a Brie-like texture, a taste that is delectably rich and buttery, with mild spicy accents of blue veins and the aroma is of mushrooms.

The fruit puree is by The Fine Cheese Co. in Bath, England. This is Lime & Chilli puree, which they make specifically for blue cheeses. Ingredients: bramley apples, cane sugar, lime juice and fresh chiles.

They also have the classic Quince to pair with Spanish Manchego, as well as a Gooseberry puree to pair with aged Gouda. And I love this – they make a cheese wedding cake (not cheesecake!) a tiered cake of cheese with fruits and nuts!

Burrata! Three Ways!

“Burrata is to mozzarella as foie gras is to chicken liver.” Russ Parsons

Burrata – fresh mozzarella stuffed with “rags” of mozzarella and heavy cream. It is a regional speciality in Italy, from the area around Bari. It is always served raw, cool, but not too cold, so all the wonderful delicate creamy, sweet, sour, and earthy flavors come through.

Keep it simple!
In a salad: Burrata on freshly made chilled tomato sauce, over arugula dressed with olive oil.

I make the tomato sauce with olive oil heated gently with garlic and red pepper flakes. Then I add crushed Italian tomatoes and finish with fresh basil, and sea salt.

On bruschetta, with high quality olive oil, sea salt and fresh ground pepper.

A combination I heard about from Valentino restaurateur, Piero Selvaggio. He says he likes his burrata topped with caviar.

So…I gave that a try. Here the burrata is topped with ikura (salmon roe). It was fabulous!

We had a great time learning how to make fresh mozzarella and burrata while attending the Cal Poly Farmstead Cheesemaker course which I highly recommend for those with a passion for cheese.

Burrata tip: use a serrated knife to cut the ball into quarters.

POST post 11/18:
A Burrata Bonus – Burrata Four Ways!
After posting about this delicious cheese, we went to dinner at Melisse Restaurant in Santa Monica. Chef Josiah had burrata on the menu…his was heavenly, topped with an ethereal basil foam.