Artichoke with Fragrant Tomato Broth

Artichoke – sans mayo or butter?
You bet.

Heat about a quarter cup of olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat, add 4 cloves chopped garlic, cook for a few minutes but do not brown. Add about 6 cups of vegetable stock along with a  10 oz. can of diced seeded peeled tomatoes and juice, a cup of white wine,  a half teaspoon each of dried basil and thyme, and a bay leaf, sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Add trimmed organic globe artichoke (or two), bring to a boil, then lower the heat and cook covered.
When the artichoke is almost tender, remove the bay leaf, add a half cup of rinsed capers and some chopped fresh basil. Adjust seasoning and finish cooking for about 5 minutes. Serve the tender artichoke in a soup bowl over the fragrant tomato broth. Ladle more broth and garlic and capers over the artichoke. Very flavorful,  and lower fat than some recipes…So I’m submitting this dish to Giz & Psychgrad’s Tried, Tested and True 2 Event at Equal Opportunity Kitchen.
They say, “We are asking you to submit your health-promoting tried, tested and true recipes. This can be any sort of dish – appetizer/soup/bread/main/dessert – your choice. But, it should be a low calorie dish, one that you’ve adapted from a higher fat to be a healthier choice, a vegetarian option, just to give you a few suggestions. Please don’t feel restricted. Just think about a submission that’s healthy and tastes good – that you would feed to someone you love knowing that you were promoting good, healthy eating.” I think this dish fits the bill.
To Your Good Health!

Heart Healthy Salmon & Scallop, Two Ways

Grilled Salmon and Scallop, Lemon Orange Basil Sauce
Steamed Asparagus
Brown Rice, Dill Tofu Sauce

Steamed Salmon & Scallop
Roasted Red Pepper Eggplant Coulis
Brown Rice, Asparagus Spears with Dijon Shallot Vinaigrette
In addition to Wild Salmon, Cannellini Bean Basil Broth here are two more Heart Healthy dishes.
The first photograph may look rich, however the sauce on the fish is fresh lemon and orange juices whisked with some extra virgin olive oil and fresh chiffonade of basil. The creamy brown rice sauce is made from tofu blended with fresh dill, Bragg Liquid Aminos, tamari, and spices. This is a delicious savory sauce – great on rice, vegetables, chicken or fish. I’m happy to provide a detailed recipe upon request.
In the second photo the fish is cooked in a Bamboo Steamer Basket, served with a coulis made from roasted red pepper, eggplant, chile and spices. The cholesterol lowering brown rice molded in the center is topped with the folate-rich asparagus spears that were dipped in the dijon vinaigrette.
If you are imbibing red wine for your heart, try pairing a fruity Pinot Noir with the steamed dish and perhaps a Zinfandel with the grilled one.

Heart Health Benefits of Scallops:
Scallops are good source of a very important nutrient for cardiovascular health, vitamin B12, and of omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium and potassium.

Heart Health Benefits of Soy Protein:
Tofu is a very good source of soy protein. Research on soy protein in recent years has shown that regular intake of soy protein can help to lower total cholesterol levels. From The World’s Healthiest Foods website.
To Your Health!

Wild Salmon, Cannellini Bean Basil Broth


Heart Healthy Wild Salmon, Cannellini Bean Basil Broth

I having been preparing and photographing some heart healthy dishes. This one is a flavorful low-fat/low-sodium chicken broth with cannellini beans, minced garlic sautéed in extra virgin olive oil, with rough chopped fresh basil. This earthy soup is topped with crispy-skin fresh wild salmon rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

Health Benefits of Cannellini Beans

These beans are low-fat, high in fiber and provide a high quality of magnesium, fiber, iron and folate. They help cut cholesterol. The beans fiber binds to fat to help flush it from the body. It’s also loaded with folate which helps lower levels of homocysteine, which clogs arteries. From Today’s Women & Health.



I am submitting this photo to the CLICK theme-based monthly food photography event for this month, which features any and all kinds of beans ‘n lentils.


Wild Alaskan Sockeye Salmon

This unique species of salmon begin their lives by spawning in the Alaskan fresh water lakes that flow into the Naknek and Egegik river systems. After living and growing for 1 to 2 years in these pristine waters, they make their way down river and thrive for another 2 to 3 years in the cold waters of the North Pacific and the Bering Sea.
During their life in the Pacific Ocean, the sockeye feed on plankton and krill, this gives them their bright red color.

Also their unique natural diet promotes their healthy high levels of Omega-3 fatty acids. On their return to the bay as mature wild sockeye salmon, the fish are selectively harvested only after enough salmon have returned safely to their spawning grounds. The fishery is carefully monitored to allow future generations of sockeye the same life cycle, and preserve this wonderful and unique salmon species. They are truly one of the healthiest fish to eat in the world.
This fabulous salmon was fished by Randy Houghton and his crew of White Cane Sockeye Salmon.

Slow Roasted Wild Sockeye, Red Potatoes, Citrus Herb Vinaigrette
Red Potatoes are sliced on a mandoline, layered into the roasting pan, drizzled with olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and pepper. Baked at 425 for about 20 to 25 minutes.
Lemon slices are scattered over the potatoes, topped with the seasoned sockeye, and more lemon slices and pitted kalamata olives. Roasted at 250 for 25 to 30 minutes (or to your preference).
Citrus Herb Vinaigrette: 4 parts olive oil, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part orange juice, salt and pepper are whisked together. Mix in fresh thyme leaves and chopped basil. When the salmon is cooked, the vinaigrette is generously ladled over the warm fish.
This excellent recipe was inspired by one in Country Living magazine.